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How Salt is made?

Observe the below picture to know The Manufacturing Process of Salt

Brine is water containing a high concentration of salt. The most obvious source of brine is the ocean, but it can also be obtained from salty lakes and underground pools of salt water. 
The brine in the first cylinder passes through tubes heated by steam. The brine boils and its steam enters the next cylinder, where it heats the brine there. The steam from this brine heats the brine in the next cylinder, and so on. In each cylinder the condensation of steam causes the pressure inside to drop, allowing the brine to boil at a lower temperature. 


Salt is removed from the bottom of the cylinders as a thick slurry. It is filtered to remove excess brine, dried, and passed through screens to sort the particles by size. Salt made this way is known as vacuum pan salt and consists of small cubic crystals. 


Brine may also be processed in a grainer. The brine is chemically purified and pumped into a long open pan heated by steam running through pipes immersed in the brine. The brine is heated to a temperature slightly below the boiling point and flakes of salt form on its surface as it evaporates. Usually a temperature of about 194°F (90°C) is used. Lower temperatures produce larger flakes and higher temperatures produce smaller flakes. 


The flakes grow until they sink to the bottom of the pan, where they are collected and dried. Grainer salt consists of small flakes rather than cubes and is preferred for certain uses in food processing. Sometimes the Alberger process is used, in which the brine is first partially evaporated in a vacuum evaporator then moved to a grainer. This process produces a mixture of flakes and cubes. 


At this point salt used for most purposes is ready to be packaged in bags or boxes and shipped to consumers. To make iodized table salt, however, potassium iodide is added, then magnesium carbonate, calcium silicate, calcium phosphate, magnesium silicate, or calcium carbonate is added to make it free-flowing. The salt is then packaged and shipped to restaurants and grocery stores.



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  • 8 At this point salt used for most purposes is ready to be packaged in bags or boxes and shipped to consumers. To make iodized table salt, however, potassium iodide is added, then magnesium carbonate, calcium silicate, calcium phosphate, magnesium silicate, or calcium carbonate is added to make it free-flowing. The salt is then packaged and shipped to restaurants and grocery stores.





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  • 7 Brine may also be processed in a grainer. The brine is chemically purified and pumped into a long open pan heated by steam running through pipes immersed in the brine. The brine is heated to a temperature slightly below the boiling point and flakes of salt form on its surface as it evaporates. Usually a temperature of about 194°F (90°C) is used. Lower temperatures produce larger flakes and higher temperatures produce smaller flakes. The flakes grow until they sink to the bottom of the pan, where they are collected and dried. Grainer salt consists of small flakes rather than cubes and is preferred for certain uses in food processing. Sometimes the Alberger process is used, in which the brine is first partially evaporated in a vacuum evaporator then moved to a grainer. This process produces a mixture of flakes and cubes.



  • 8 At this point salt used for most purposes is ready to be packaged in bags or boxes and shipped to consumers. To make iodized table salt, however, potassium iodide is added, then magnesium carbonate, calcium silicate, calcium phosphate, magnesium silicate, or calcium carbonate is added to make it free-flowing. The salt is then packaged and shipped to restaurants and grocery stores.


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