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National Emblem


The State Emblem of India, as the national emblem of Republic of India is called, is an adaptation of the Lion Capital of Ashoka from 250 BCE at Sarnath, preserved in the Sarnath Museum near Varanasi, India. 

A representation of Lion Capital of Ashoka was initially adopted as the emblem of the Dominion of India in December 1947. 

The current version of the emblem was officially adopted on 26 January 1950, the day when India became a republic.

In the original, there are four lions, standing back to back, mounted on an abacus with a frieze carrying sculptures in high relief of an elephant, a galloping horse, a bull and a lion separated by intervening wheels over a bell-shaped lotus. 

Carved out of a single block of polished sandstone, the Capital is crowned by the Wheel of the Law (Dharma Chakra).

The wheel appears in relief in the centre of the abacus with a bull on right and a horse on left and the outlines of other wheels on extreme right and left. 

The bell-shaped lotus has been omitted. 

The words Satyameva Jayate from Mundaka Upanishad, meaning 'Truth Alone Triumphs', are inscribed below the abacus in Devanagari script.

The emblem forms a part of the official letterhead of the Government of India and appears on all Indian currency as well. 

It also functions as the national emblem of India in many places and appears prominently on Indian passports. 

The Ashoka Chakra (wheel) on its base features in the centre of the national flag of India.

The usage of the emblem is regulated and restricted under State Emblem of India (Prohibition of Improper Use) Act, 2005

No individual or private organisation is permitted to use the emblem for official correspondence.


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